How do you deal with the difference between Linux and Unix kernels?

July 31, 2020 by Logan Reynolds

 

When you know what is the difference between a Linux and Unix kernel error code on your computer, you should consider these troubleshooting ideas.

 

 

Thank you very much Mr. Mayer for your comments. I appreciate you reading the article. Please read my views below:

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@ Macus Mayer
> What you write is true, but misleading. What for? You say there are some exceptions in Unix-like kernels that follow the microkernel approach, but you are not giving examples of microkernel operating systems (NeXTStep and Mac OS X would be such operating systems). By the way). All the operating systems you mentioned (from Sys V to Solaris) use the same Linux: a monolithic kernel, so it is not unique to Linux.
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@Himanshu
I have not mentioned anywhere in this article that I am only comparing Linux to the Unix systems I have listed (from Sys V to Solaris). I made it clear that these are some of the more popular Unix-like systems.

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@ Macus Mayer
> Again, what you write is true, but misleading. Yes, in the past you had to plug in the kernel to add and restart a new driver (even SunOS> 4 needed it). ABOUThowever, most of the Unix-like operating systems you mentioned have loadable kernel modules. It is currently a standard, not Linux-specific. It distinguishes modern Unix-like operating systems from their roots 30-40 years ago, but is by no means Linux-specific.
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@Himanshu
First of all, I mentioned that I am now comparing Linux to traditional Unix systems ("Although normal Unix / Unix systems require ..."), so I don't think this confusion will ever arise.



Second, you yourself gave an example of a Unix system (SunOS 4), which still requires static links. Where is the confusion now ???


Is Unix a kernel or OS?


Finally, I would like to reiterate that the Unix-like systems I mentioned at the beginning of this article are just a few examples ("Some of the more popular members of this family ...") and not the ones I I compare directly with Linux with.

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@ Macus Mayer
> What you write here is simply wrong. That's all. “Typically, Linux operating systems are not preemptive, whileSome Unix systems, such as Solaris 2.x, etc., are completely preemptive. " This is simply not true (well, part of the proposal for Linux>). I invite you to explore the kernel sources, in particular http://lxr.linux.no/linux>/kernel/sched.c. You will find scheduling routines for interrupting processes and> removing a processor from them.
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@Himanshu
According to your last line, there are two aspects. One is to prevent user-mode processes, which is good in Linux, and the other is to prevent kernel-mode processes, which can be done if the kernel is unloaded, and if you read the heading of this paragraph, it says: “Proactive and not proactive nucleus". Kernel preemption support was added in Linux2.6, but it is also incomplete. Previously, the Linux kernel was not a priority.


what is the difference between linux and unix kernel

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@ Macus Mayer
> You seem to be confusing two things here: real-time planning and> proactive planning. These two are not about the same. The only two operating systems known to me in whichx, non-preemptive (i.e. cooperative) scheduling was used, there were Mac> OS before version 9 and Windows before NT. I don't remember if the Windows 95 family had preventative features or not, 3.1 definitely not. No modern operating system uses a non-preemptive calendar!
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@Himanshu
I'm not mixing anything here. I said clearly, "Usually real-time operating systems have fully preemptive kernels," and there is nothing wrong with that. I never said that real-time scheduling is preventative scheduling. I think you will be confused between proactive scheduling and kernel unloading. On this point, I'm talking about core displacement.

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@ Macus Mayer
> Yes, Linux is not a real-time operating system by default. But no, the Linux kernel does not use collaborative scheduling. Otherwise, a frozen Apache process can overload and shut down the entire web server, right? No one wants to run their corporate websites or databases from a Linux machine, but they are explicit do it as you say.
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Is Linux a version of Unix?


@Himanshu
The Linux 2.4 kernel was not proactive. Kernel preemption support was added in 2.6 and, as mentioned, is still pending.

If your hung process is in user mode, for example, Linux Scheduler can easily prevent this. If it gets stuck in kernel mode, it can also prevent another high-priority process from starting in user mode. Since Linux 2.6, the same process that hangs in kernel mode can also be prevented by any other process running in kernel mode.

I think the main thing that confused you was proactive planning, not kernel prevention. I talked about kernel preemption while you were thinking about proactive scheduling. They are a little different and I hope you get my point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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